German chancellor says he is working fast to find alternatives to Russian gas

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Saturday that she was working hard to find alternatives to Russian gas supplies as tensions rise between Moscow and the West. “The issue of Nord Stream 2 is an entirely economic issue,” Merkel said at a press conference at the close of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina. “I am pushing ahead with diversification efforts.” Nord Stream 2 is the name of the planned pipeline for gas from Russia to Germany across the Baltic Sea. A consortium led by Russian energy giant Gazprom started building the pipeline in April, aiming to complete it by the end of next year. Critics say this project will give Moscow greater control over European energy supplies, and US President Donald Trump has said it would allow Germany to become “wholly dependent on Russian energy.” Gas is a key issue in relations between Moscow and Washington — which is vying with Russia to be Europe’s top supplier — because Russia produces more natural gas than any other country in Europe…

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Saturday that she was working hard to find alternatives to Russian gas supplies as tensions rise between Moscow and the West.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said Saturday that she was working hard to find alternatives to Russian gas supplies as tensions rise between Moscow and the West.

“We must ensure that we have an economic basis when it comes to energy,” Merkel told reporters. “I’m convinced that this can only be achieved if there are other suppliers than Russia.”

The German leader also said Germany would continue with its diversification efforts so it doesn’t have too much dependence on any single supplier or region of origin, such as Russian natural gas.

“The issue of Nord Stream 2 is an entirely economic issue,” Merkel said at a press conference at the close of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina. “I am pushing ahead with diversification efforts.”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she was working fast to find alternatives to Russian gas, adding that Germany would not be blackmailed with the threat of a cutoff.

Merkel said at a press conference at the close of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina: “The issue of Nord Stream 2 is an entirely economic issue.”

She added that she wanted to diversify her country’s energy sources away from Russia as soon as possible but did not want this to happen through sanctions or any other means that might harm trade relations between two countries with significant trade ties.

Nord Stream 2 is the name of the planned pipeline for gas from Russia to Germany across the Baltic Sea. A consortium led by Russian energy giant Gazprom started building the pipeline in April, aiming to complete it by the end of next year.

Nord Stream 2 is the name of the planned pipeline for gas from Russia to Germany across the Baltic Sea. A consortium led by Russian energy giant Gazprom started building the pipeline in April, aiming to complete it by the end of next year.

The project has drawn criticism from both sides: Poland and Lithuania view it as a threat to their energy security while Germany says it poses no threat because it can be diversified away from Russian sources.

Critics say the project will give Moscow greater control over European energy supplies, and US President Donald Trump has said it would allow Germany to become “wholly dependent on Russian energy.”

Critics say the pipeline will give Moscow greater control over European energy supplies, and US President Donald Trump has said it would allow Germany to become “wholly dependent on Russian energy.”

The Nord Stream 2 project is opposed by a number of EU countries and some in Washington. The critics say it will increase Europe’s dependence on Russian natural gas and make the country more vulnerable to blackmail from Moscow. They also point out that Germany would have no alternative if Russia cut off its supplies as they sometimes do during periods of political tension with Ukraine or other countries along its border.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she was working fast to find alternatives to Russian gas but could not answer questions about how this might affect other suppliers like Norway or Algeria, which get most of their supply from Qatar via pipelines that cross the sea between Brazil and South America before reaching land-based terminals at Rotterdam (where it arrives via another route).

Gas is a key issue in relations between Moscow and Washington, which is vying with Russia to be Europe’s top supplier of natural gas. The US wants its allies to buy more American gas instead of relying on Russia for energy supplies.

Gas is a key issue in relations between Moscow and Washington, which is vying with Russia to be Europe’s top supplier of natural gas. The US wants its allies to buy more American gas instead of relying on Russia for energy supplies.

Europe has been buying more liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the United States and less from Russia since 2014 because it fears that supplies could be cut off if there are any disputes over Ukraine – where Gazprom owns most of the country’s production facilities.

Merkel says Germany needs Russian gas for now but will look for alternatives in the future

Ms Merkel said Germany needed Russian gas for now but would look for alternatives in the future.

She said she was working hard to find alternatives to Russian supplies, adding that diversification efforts were underway and would be accelerated under her leadership.

“The Nord Stream 2 project is an entirely economic issue,” she said after meeting Russian President Vladimir Putin in Sochi on Thursday.”It’s not about politics or energy security,” Ms Merkel added during a joint press conference with Mr Putin following their talks (see below).

Conclusion

In the long run, however, it is clear that Germany and other countries will have to diversify their energy supplies. The country’s reliance on Russian gas has created significant political problems for Berlin in recent years. However, without Russian gas, Germany would have to find alternative sources of energy that are not so expensive or difficult to transport across the Baltic Sea.

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